All posts by Matt Hamblen

Tablet shipments are down, but they’re gaining ground at work

Overall tablet shipments have dropped 20% in recent quarters, but workplace uses for the devices are still growing in the U.S.

Based on a survey of 300 U.S. companies completed in September, analyst firm J. Gold Associates determined that the number of companies who have over half their workforce using tablets will grow by up to 155% in the next three years.

"This indicates a strong upward trend," the firm said in an 11-page report on the survey. Computerworld received a review copy of the report.

The survey also asked about company plans to rely on workers who supply their own tablets under a BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) scenario.

The survey found that about 12% of the companies surveyed currently rely on BYOD for nearly all their tablet uses, a number that will grow to 21% in three years -- a 78% growth rate. By comparison, 9% more of those heavy tablet users will be using corporate-provided devices by then.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Tablet shipments are down, but they’re gaining ground at work

Overall tablet shipments have dropped 20% in recent quarters, but workplace uses for the devices are still growing in the U.S. Based on a survey of 300 U.S. companies completed in September, analyst firm J. Gold Associates determined that the number of companies who have over half their workforce using tablets will grow by up to 155% in the next three years. "This indicates a strong upward trend," the firm said in an 11-page report on the survey. Computerworld received a review copy of the report. The survey also asked about company plans to rely on workers who supply their own tablets under a BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) scenario.

The survey found that about 12% of the companies surveyed currently rely on BYOD for nearly all their tablet uses, a number that will grow to 21% in three years -- a 78% growth rate. By comparison, 9% more of those heavy tablet users will be using corporate-provided devices by then.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Tablet shipments are down, but they’re gaining ground at work

Overall tablet shipments have dropped 20% in recent quarters, but workplace uses for the devices are still growing in the U.S.

Based on a survey of 300 U.S. companies completed in September, analyst firm J. Gold Associates determined that the number of companies who have over half their workforce using tablets will grow by up to 155% in the next three years.

"This indicates a strong upward trend," the firm said in an 11-page report on the survey. Computerworld received a review copy of the report.

The survey also asked about company plans to rely on workers who supply their own tablets under a BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) scenario.

The survey found that about 12% of the companies surveyed currently rely on BYOD for nearly all their tablet uses, a number that will grow to 21% in three years -- a 78% growth rate. By comparison, 9% more of those heavy tablet users will be using corporate-provided devices by then.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Half of U.S. businesses have no formal BYOD policy for security

Years after the widespread adoption of workplace smartphones, more than half of U.S. companies said they have no formal BYOD (bring your own device) policy to safeguard their enterprises, according to a survey.

The survey of 447 businesses of all sizes was conducted over the summer by systems integrator Champion Solutions Group. It found that 53% of those businesses haven't implemented a formal BYOD policy, while more than one-fourth confessed they have no systematic security approach, much less a formal policy.

The survey findings are "ridiculous … surprising," said Champion CEO Chris Pyle, in an interview. Mobile security best practices have been promulgated by analysts and security firms for more than a decade to protect sensitive corporate data, but there is apparently widespread variation about how companies implement security for BYOD workers.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Half of U.S. businesses have no formal BYOD policy for security

Years after the widespread adoption of workplace smartphones, more than half of U.S. companies said they have no formal BYOD (bring your own device) policy to safeguard their enterprises, according to a survey. The survey of 447 businesses of all sizes was conducted over the summer by systems integrator Champion Solutions Group. It found that 53% of those businesses haven't implemented a formal BYOD policy, while more than one-fourth confessed they have no systematic security approach, much less a formal policy.

The survey findings are "ridiculous … surprising," said Champion CEO Chris Pyle, in an interview. Mobile security best practices have been promulgated by analysts and security firms for more than a decade to protect sensitive corporate data, but there is apparently widespread variation about how companies implement security for BYOD workers.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Half of U.S. businesses have no formal BYOD policy for security

Years after the widespread adoption of workplace smartphones, more than half of U.S. companies said they have no formal BYOD (bring your own device) policy to safeguard their enterprises, according to a survey.

The survey of 447 businesses of all sizes was conducted over the summer by systems integrator Champion Solutions Group. It found that 53% of those businesses haven't implemented a formal BYOD policy, while more than one-fourth confessed they have no systematic security approach, much less a formal policy.

The survey findings are "ridiculous … surprising," said Champion CEO Chris Pyle, in an interview. Mobile security best practices have been promulgated by analysts and security firms for more than a decade to protect sensitive corporate data, but there is apparently widespread variation about how companies implement security for BYOD workers.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

How T-Mobile’s video streaming works

How can T-Mobile afford to offer its Binge On streaming video service at no extra cost to its Simple Choice customers who pay for more than 3GB of LTE data a month?

Won't it be crummy video? Won't it cause congestion on T-Mobile's networks and lead to frustrations for customers?

T-Mobile officials offered a few technical details after Tuesday's announcement to shed light on how it will make video streaming from 24 content providers possible starting Sunday.

What about the quality?

T-Mobile called its streaming service "optimized," although some analysts have preferred to call it "compressed" video that delivers 480p quality to smartphones and tablets. That's far lower resolution than the widely available HD 1080p quality. Some analysts referred to T-Mobile's proprietary technology as a form of "adaptive bitrate optimization coding technology." This is software that can automatically adapt the amount of data sent to appear on a smartphone from larger devices.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

How T-Mobile’s video streaming works

How can T-Mobile afford to offer its Binge On streaming video service at no extra cost to its Simple Choice customers who pay for more than 3GB of LTE data a month? Won't it be crummy video? Won't it cause congestion on T-Mobile's networks and lead to frustrations for customers?

T-Mobile officials offered a few technical details after Tuesday's announcement to shed light on how it will make video streaming from 24 content providers possible starting Sunday.

What about the quality?

T-Mobile called its streaming service "optimized," although some analysts have preferred to call it "compressed" video that delivers 480p quality to smartphones and tablets. That's far lower resolution than the widely available HD 1080p quality. Some analysts referred to T-Mobile's proprietary technology as a form of "adaptive bitrate optimization coding technology." This is software that can automatically adapt the amount of data sent to appear on a smartphone from larger devices.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

How T-Mobile’s video streaming works

How can T-Mobile afford to offer its Binge On streaming video service at no extra cost to its Simple Choice customers who pay for more than 3GB of LTE data a month?

Won't it be crummy video? Won't it cause congestion on T-Mobile's networks and lead to frustrations for customers?

T-Mobile officials offered a few technical details after Tuesday's announcement to shed light on how it will make video streaming from 24 content providers possible starting Sunday.

What about the quality?

T-Mobile called its streaming service "optimized," although some analysts have preferred to call it "compressed" video that delivers 480p quality to smartphones and tablets. That's far lower resolution than the widely available HD 1080p quality. Some analysts referred to T-Mobile's proprietary technology as a form of "adaptive bitrate optimization coding technology." This is software that can automatically adapt the amount of data sent to appear on a smartphone from larger devices.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

T-Mobile launches free video-streaming service

T-Mobile announced Tuesday it will offer free streaming of wireless video to certain T-Mobile customers for services such as HBO, Hulu, Netflix and 21 others. The service, called Binge On, will be available starting Sunday at no extra charge to T-Mobile's Simple Choice customers paying for 3GB of data. In addition, the carrier said it doubled the LTE data caps at every level in Simple Choice at no extra cost. "T-Mobile is un-leashing entertainment and giving customers exactly what they want," CEO John Legere declared at an event in Los Angeles that was webcast.

He also said that neither the 24 video-streaming services involved nor T-Mobile customers will pay for the service. Binge On is powered by new technology built into T-Mobile's network, which optimizes video for mobile screens and minimizes data consumption.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

T-Mobile launches free video-streaming service

T-Mobile announced Tuesday it will offer free streaming of wireless video to certain T-Mobile customers for services such as HBO, Hulu, Netflix and 21 others.

The service, called Binge On, will be available starting Sunday at no extra charge to T-Mobile's Simple Choice customers paying for 3GB of data. In addition, the carrier said it doubled the LTE data caps at every level in Simple Choice at no extra cost.

"T-Mobile is un-leashing entertainment and giving customers exactly what they want," CEO John Legere declared at an event in Los Angeles that was webcast.

He also said that neither the 24 video-streaming services involved nor T-Mobile customers will pay for the service. Binge On is powered by new technology built into T-Mobile's network, which optimizes video for mobile screens and minimizes data consumption.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

T-Mobile launches free video-streaming service

T-Mobile announced Tuesday it will offer free streaming of wireless video to certain T-Mobile customers for services such as HBO, Hulu, Netflix and 21 others.

The service, called Binge On, will be available starting Sunday at no extra charge to T-Mobile's Simple Choice customers paying for 3GB of data. In addition, the carrier said it doubled the LTE data caps at every level in Simple Choice at no extra cost.

"T-Mobile is un-leashing entertainment and giving customers exactly what they want," CEO John Legere declared at an event in Los Angeles that was webcast.

He also said that neither the 24 video-streaming services involved nor T-Mobile customers will pay for the service. Binge On is powered by new technology built into T-Mobile's network, which optimizes video for mobile screens and minimizes data consumption.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Tablet demand next year down to just 17%, Gartner says

Only 17% of 19,000 consumers surveyed in the U.S. and five other countries plan to buy a tablet computer in the next year, Gartner said Thursday.

That finding follows more than a year of declines in tablet shipments and sales, due partly to the availability of larger smartphones, often called phablets, like the Apple iPhone 6 Plus and 6S Plus with a display size of 5.5-in. or the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge Plus or Galaxy Note 5 at 5.7-in.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Tablet demand next year down to just 17%, Gartner says

Only 17% of 19,000 consumers surveyed in the U.S. and five other countries plan to buy a tablet computer in the next year, Gartner said Thursday.

That finding follows more than a year of declines in tablet shipments and sales, due partly to the availability of larger smartphones, often called phablets, like the Apple iPhone 6 Plus and 6S Plus with a display size of 5.5-in. or the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge Plus or Galaxy Note 5 at 5.7-in.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Tablet demand next year down to just 17%, Gartner says

Only 17% of 19,000 consumers surveyed in the U.S. and five other countries plan to buy a tablet computer in the next year, Gartner said Thursday.

That finding follows more than a year of declines in tablet shipments and sales, due partly to the availability of larger smartphones, often called phablets, like the Apple iPhone 6 Plus and 6S Plus with a display size of 5.5-in. or the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge Plus or Galaxy Note 5 at 5.7-in.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Sprint owner confirms job cuts will be ‘in the thousands’

Sprint Chairman and SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son told reporters in Tokyo early Wednesday that job cuts at Sprint will be "in the thousands" as part of a restructuring plan.

His comments came as SoftBank, which owns more than 70% of Sprint, reported its quarterly earnings.

"Sprint is now in the position to increase the pace of user acquisition while cutting costs," Son said, according to Bloomberg and other news sources. "We will also cut staff. The cuts will be in the thousands."

Son's comments are not out of line with things Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure has been telling Sprint workers for months.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Sprint owner confirms job cuts will be “in the thousands”

Sprint Chairman and SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son told reporters in Tokyo early Wednesday that job cuts at Sprint will be "in the thousands" as part of a restructuring plan.

His comments came as SoftBank, which owns more than 70% of Sprint, reported its quarterly earnings.

"Sprint is now in the position to increase the pace of user acquisition while cutting costs," Son said, according to Bloomberg and other news sources. "We will also cut staff. The cuts will be in the thousands."

Son's comments are not out of line with things Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure has been telling Sprint workers for months.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Sprint owner confirms job cuts will be “in the thousands”

Sprint Chairman and SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son told reporters in Tokyo early Wednesday that job cuts at Sprint will be "in the thousands" as part of a restructuring plan. His comments came as SoftBank, which owns more than 70% of Sprint, reported its quarterly earnings. "Sprint is now in the position to increase the pace of user acquisition while cutting costs," Son said, according to Bloomberg and other news sources. "We will also cut staff. The cuts will be in the thousands."

Son's comments are not out of line with things Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure has been telling Sprint workers for months.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Sprint owner confirms job cuts will be ‘in the thousands’

Sprint Chairman and SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son told reporters in Tokyo early Wednesday that job cuts at Sprint will be "in the thousands" as part of a restructuring plan. His comments came as SoftBank, which owns more than 70% of Sprint, reported its quarterly earnings. "Sprint is now in the position to increase the pace of user acquisition while cutting costs," Son said, according to Bloomberg and other news sources. "We will also cut staff. The cuts will be in the thousands."

Son's comments are not out of line with things Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure has been telling Sprint workers for months.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

T-Mobile offers users free 4G LTE CellSpot to boost indoor cellular coverage

T-Mobile on Tuesday announced an indoor 4G LTE CellSpot that will help small businesses and residents connect up to 16 simultaneous calls or data sessions.

The device is free to T-Mobile Simple Choice postpaid customers as long as they remain with the carrier, and a $25 deposit is required. The device will be available Wednesday through T-Mobile customer care or participating stores nationwide.

T-Mobile CEO John Legere called the CellSpot the first mini tower available from a U.S. carrier, and revved up the rhetoric that other carriers aren't letting customers freely decide where to put small cell devices for better cellular coverage.

"They'll do absolutely everything they can to bleed you dry," Legere said of his competitors in a statement, with similar comments in a video posted Monday on his Twitter feed.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

T-Mobile offers users free 4G LTE CellSpot to boost indoor cellular coverage

T-Mobile on Tuesday announced an indoor 4G LTE CellSpot that will help small businesses and residents connect up to 16 simultaneous calls or data sessions. The device is free to T-Mobile Simple Choice postpaid customers as long as they remain with the carrier, and a $25 deposit is required. The device will be available Wednesday through T-Mobile customer care or participating stores nationwide. T-Mobile CEO John Legere called the CellSpot the first mini tower available from a U.S. carrier, and revved up the rhetoric that other carriers aren't letting customers freely decide where to put small cell devices for better cellular coverage.

"They'll do absolutely everything they can to bleed you dry," Legere said of his competitors in a statement, with similar comments in a video posted Monday on his Twitter feed.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

T-Mobile offers users free 4G LTE CellSpot to boost indoor cellular coverage

T-Mobile on Tuesday announced an indoor 4G LTE CellSpot that will help small businesses and residents connect up to 16 simultaneous calls or data sessions. The device is free to T-Mobile Simple Choice postpaid customers as long as they remain with the carrier, and a $25 deposit is required. The device will be available Wednesday through T-Mobile customer care or participating stores nationwide. T-Mobile CEO John Legere called the CellSpot the first mini tower available from a U.S. carrier, and revved up the rhetoric that other carriers aren't letting customers freely decide where to put small cell devices for better cellular coverage.

"They'll do absolutely everything they can to bleed you dry," Legere said of his competitors in a statement, with similar comments in a video posted Monday on his Twitter feed.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

T-Mobile offers users free 4G LTE CellSpot to boost indoor cellular coverage

T-Mobile on Tuesday announced an indoor 4G LTE CellSpot that will help small businesses and residents connect up to 16 simultaneous calls or data sessions.

The device is free to T-Mobile Simple Choice postpaid customers as long as they remain with the carrier, and a $25 deposit is required. The device will be available Wednesday through T-Mobile customer care or participating stores nationwide.

T-Mobile CEO John Legere called the CellSpot the first mini tower available from a U.S. carrier, and revved up the rhetoric that other carriers aren't letting customers freely decide where to put small cell devices for better cellular coverage.

"They'll do absolutely everything they can to bleed you dry," Legere said of his competitors in a statement, with similar comments in a video posted Monday on his Twitter feed.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Sprint reports bigger-than-expected loss, stock sags 7%

Sprint's stock fell nearly 7% at mid-day Tuesday after the wireless carrier posted a quarterly loss greater than analysts had predicted and revenues that were down 6% compared to a year ago.

The carrier also said in a statement that it plans to cut $2 billion or more in operating expenses for its fiscal 2016 year, which begins in April.

Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure nonetheless pointed to customer momentum and network improvements in the company's second fiscal quarter, which ended Sept. 30. "This quarter marks a very important milestone in our turnaround," he said during a morning call for analysts.

Claure said Sprint was the only national carrier to improve its post-paid net customer numbers, which were up 237,000 compared to net losses of 500,000 for the same quarter a year ago. Sprint also had its best-ever post-paid churn rate (a measure of cancellations), which improved to 1.54% from 2.18% a year ago.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Sprint reports bigger-than-expected loss, stock sags 7%

Sprint's stock fell nearly 7% at mid-day Tuesday after the wireless carrier posted a quarterly loss greater than analysts had predicted and revenues that were down 6% compared to a year ago. The carrier also said in a statement that it plans to cut $2 billion or more in operating expenses for its fiscal 2016 year, which begins in April. Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure nonetheless pointed to customer momentum and network improvements in the company's second fiscal quarter, which ended Sept. 30. "This quarter marks a very important milestone in our turnaround," he said during a morning call for analysts.

Claure said Sprint was the only national carrier to improve its post-paid net customer numbers, which were up 237,000 compared to net losses of 500,000 for the same quarter a year ago. Sprint also had its best-ever post-paid churn rate (a measure of cancellations), which improved to 1.54% from 2.18% a year ago.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here