All posts by Katherine Noyes

For many Oracle database users, Dec. 1 deadline looms

Companies that use a standard edition of Oracle's database software should be aware that a rapidly approaching deadline could mean increased licensing costs.

Oracle will stop selling its Database Standard Edition (SE) and Standard Edition 1 (SE1) products on Dec. 1, meaning customers who use those products will be "frozen in scalability," because they won't be able to buy new licenses or upgrade to new SE or SE1 releases, said Eliot Arlo Colon, senior vice president and Oracle practice leader with Miro Consulting.

The Standard editions have been viable choices for companies seeking a lower-cost alternative to Oracle’s Enterprise Edition, Colon wrote in a report Thursday, but "Oracle is now changing the rules around Standard Edition licensing."

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

For many Oracle database users, Dec. 1 deadline looms

Companies that use a standard edition of Oracle's database software should be aware that a rapidly approaching deadline could mean increased licensing costs. Oracle will stop selling its Database Standard Edition (SE) and Standard Edition 1 (SE1) products on Dec. 1, meaning customers who use those products will be "frozen in scalability," because they won't be able to buy new licenses or upgrade to new SE or SE1 releases, said Eliot Arlo Colon, senior vice president and Oracle practice leader with Miro Consulting.

The Standard editions have been viable choices for companies seeking a lower-cost alternative to Oracle’s Enterprise Edition, Colon wrote in a report Thursday, but "Oracle is now changing the rules around Standard Edition licensing."

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

For many Oracle database users, Dec. 1 deadline looms

Companies that use a standard edition of Oracle's database software should be aware that a rapidly approaching deadline could mean increased licensing costs.

Oracle will stop selling its Database Standard Edition (SE) and Standard Edition 1 (SE1) products on Dec. 1, meaning customers who use those products will be "frozen in scalability," because they won't be able to buy new licenses or upgrade to new SE or SE1 releases, said Eliot Arlo Colon, senior vice president and Oracle practice leader with Miro Consulting.

The Standard editions have been viable choices for companies seeking a lower-cost alternative to Oracle’s Enterprise Edition, Colon wrote in a report Thursday, but "Oracle is now changing the rules around Standard Edition licensing."

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

A tale of two women: same birthday, same Social Security number, same big-data mess

It's a case that would seem to defy the odds many times over: Two Florida women born on the same day, in the same state, and given almost the same name. Though no one realized it at the time, it turns out they were also given the same Social Security number.

Joanna Rivera and Joannie Rivera only recently discovered the problem, according to a report this week, but in the meantime it's caused no end of trouble for them. Credit applications have been denied; tax returns have been rejected.

Identity theft might have been a likely assumption, but in this case, it was something different.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

A tale of two women: same birthday, same Social Security number, same big-data mess

It's a case that would seem to defy the odds many times over: Two Florida women born on the same day, in the same state, and given almost the same name. Though no one realized it at the time, it turns out they were also given the same Social Security number.

Joanna Rivera and Joannie Rivera only recently discovered the problem, according to a report this week, but in the meantime it's caused no end of trouble for them. Credit applications have been denied; tax returns have been rejected.

Identity theft might have been a likely assumption, but in this case, it was something different.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

A tale of two women: same birthday, same Social Security number, same big-data mess

It's a case that would seem to defy the odds many times over: Two Florida women born on the same day, in the same state, and given almost the same name. Though no one realized it at the time, it turns out they were also given the same Social Security number. Joanna Rivera and Joannie Rivera only recently discovered the problem, according to a report this week, but in the meantime it's caused no end of trouble for them. Credit applications have been denied; tax returns have been rejected.

Identity theft might have been a likely assumption, but in this case, it was something different.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Think your IT project is a nightmare? Check these out and you’ll feel better

There are many ways to gauge satisfaction with a new computer system, but when the people who have to use it show up for work wearing red and declare it "Code Red" day, you probably don't need to bother with a survey.

That's exactly what's scheduled to happen on Thursday in the city of Hamilton, Ontario, where government workers plan to protest the one-year anniversary of a controversial new computer system.

Ontario's Social Assistance Management System (SAMS), installed a year ago this week by the province's Ministry of Community and Social Services, was supposed be a more efficient replacement for its outdated case management system.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Think your IT project is a disaster? These’ll make you feel better

There are many ways to gauge satisfaction with a new computer system, but when the people who have to use it show up for work wearing red and declare it "Code Red" day, you probably don't need to bother with a survey.

That's exactly what's scheduled to happen this Thursday in the city of Hamilton, Ontario, where government workers plan to protest the one-year anniversary of a controversial new computer system.

Ontario's Social Assistance Management System (SAMS), installed a year ago this week by the province's Ministry of Community and Social Services, was supposed be a more efficient replacement for its outdated case management system.

It hasn't quite turned out that way.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Think your IT project is a disaster? These’ll make you feel better

There are many ways to gauge satisfaction with a new computer system, but when the people who have to use it show up for work wearing red and declare it "Code Red" day, you probably don't need to bother with a survey.

That's exactly what's scheduled to happen this Thursday in the city of Hamilton, Ontario, where government workers plan to protest the one-year anniversary of a controversial new computer system.

Ontario's Social Assistance Management System (SAMS), installed a year ago this week by the province's Ministry of Community and Social Services, was supposed be a more efficient replacement for its outdated case management system.

It hasn't quite turned out that way.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Think your IT project is a nightmare? Check these out and you’ll feel better

There are many ways to gauge satisfaction with a new computer system, but when the people who have to use it show up for work wearing red and declare it "Code Red" day, you probably don't need to bother with a survey.

That's exactly what's scheduled to happen this Thursday in the city of Hamilton, Ontario, where government workers plan to protest the one-year anniversary of a controversial new computer system.

Ontario's Social Assistance Management System (SAMS), installed a year ago this week by the province's Ministry of Community and Social Services, was supposed be a more efficient replacement for its outdated case management system.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

How big data is changing the database landscape for good

Mention the word "database," and most people think of the venerable RDBMS that has dominated the landscape for more than 30 years. That, however, may soon change.

A whole crop of new contenders are now vying for a piece of this key enterprise market, and while their approaches are diverse, most share one thing in common: A razor-sharp focus on big data.

Much of what's driving this new proliferation of alternatives is what's commonly referred to as the "three V's" underlying big data: volume, velocity and variety.

Essentially, data today is coming at us faster and in greater volumes than ever before; it's also more diverse. It's a new data world, in other words, and traditional relational database management systems weren't really designed for it.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Tibco courts ‘citizen developers’ with two new tools

One of the dominant trends in enterprise software today is the empowerment of business users, and Tibco made two product announcements on Tuesday that play into that.

First and foremost, Tibco Simplr is a new service that aims to bring automation capabilities to the nonexpert knowledge worker. First discussed by Tibco last year, Simplr aims to help such professionals automate tasks in just a few steps.

Tibco has long built software for developers, but Simplr takes its efforts in a new direction, said Brad Topliff, senior cloud product manager.

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After 10 years of profitability, Atlassian steps up for an IPO

It was late September when reports first suggested that Atlassian was planning a U.S. IPO, and on Monday, the Australian software maker followed through by filing its papers with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Neither the number of shares to be offered nor the price range have yet been determined, but the company seeks to raise as much as $250 million with the offering. It was reportedly valued above $3 billion in its last private investment round.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

After 10 years of profitability, Atlassian steps up for an IPO

It was late September when reports first suggested that Atlassian was planning a U.S. IPO, and on Monday, the Australian software maker followed through by filing its papers with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Neither the number of shares to be offered nor the price range have yet been determined, but the company seeks to raise as much as $250 million with the offering. It was reportedly valued above $3 billion in its last private investment round.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Google brings machine learning to masses with new open-source tool

Google has been working on machine learning for years deep inside its R&D labs, and some of the advances it's made have found their way into products such as Google Photos. On Monday, it launched a new, open-source tool to help share what it's learned.

TensorFlow is a machine-learning system that can run on anything from a single smartphone to thousands of data-center computers. It builds upon DistBelief, the deep-learning infrastructure Google developed back in 2011, but takes that first generation several steps further.

"TensorFlow is faster, smarter and more flexible than our old system, so it can be adapted much more easily to new products and research," wrote Google CEO Sundar Pichai in a blog post announcing the news.

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Salesforce users: Big contracts signed early may get you special discounts, but watch out after that

Volume discounts are nothing unusual in the world of enterprise software, but over the last year or so Salesforce reportedly has been approaching customers early about upcoming renewals and wooing them with considerable extra discounts if they sign on ahead of time for the CRM vendor's full software suite.

That's according to a report Thursday in The Register, which attributed the information to an anonymous industry source who advises companies about Salesforce licensing.

The discount can be as much as 25 percent on top of Salesforce's standard volume discount, according to the report. But it's only available if customers sign up not just for its Sales Cloud but also for Marketing Cloud and consulting services.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Salesforce users: Early contracts might get you discounts, but after that watch out

Volume discounts are nothing unusual in the world of enterprise software, but over the last year or so Salesforce reportedly has been approaching customers early about upcoming renewals and wooing them with considerable extra discounts if they sign on ahead of time for the CRM vendor's full software suite.

That's according to a report Thursday in The Register, which attributed the information to an anonymous industry source who advises companies about Salesforce licensing.

The discount can be as much as 25 percent on top of Salesforce's standard volume discount, according to the report. But it's only available if customers sign up not just for its Sales Cloud but also for Marketing Cloud and consulting services.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Salesforce users: Early contracts might get you discounts, but after that watch out

Volume discounts are nothing unusual in the world of enterprise software, but over the last year or so Salesforce reportedly has been approaching customers early about upcoming renewals and wooing them with considerable extra discounts if they sign on ahead of time for the CRM vendor's full software suite. That's according to a report Thursday in The Register, which attributed the information to an anonymous industry source who advises companies about Salesforce licensing.

The discount can be as much as 25 percent on top of Salesforce's standard volume discount, according to the report. But it's only available if customers sign up not just for its Sales Cloud but also for Marketing Cloud and consulting services.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Salesforce users: Early contracts might get you discounts, but after that watch out

Volume discounts are nothing unusual in the world of enterprise software, but over the last year or so Salesforce reportedly has been approaching customers early about upcoming renewals and wooing them with considerable extra discounts if they sign on ahead of time for the CRM vendor's full software suite.

That's according to a report Thursday in The Register, which attributed the information to an anonymous industry source who advises companies about Salesforce licensing.

The discount can be as much as 25 percent on top of Salesforce's standard volume discount, according to the report. But it's only available if customers sign up not just for its Sales Cloud but also for Marketing Cloud and consulting services.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

This startup emerged from stealth to help SMBs get a grip on unstructured data

It's hard enough for companies to tame the masses of structured data now coming their way at top speed each day, but unstructured data -- the kind that doesn't fit tidily into traditional spreadsheets or databases -- is an even bigger challenge. That's typically the domain of expert users in large enterprises equipped with high-end software, and it's also where Taste Analytics has set its sights.

Taste Analytics emerged from stealth on Thursday with the launch of Signals, a new textual analytics tool it says can help users in businesses of any size crunch a wide variety of data without having to rely on highly trained data scientists or IT experts for help.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

This startup emerged from stealth to help SMBs get a grip on unstructured data

It's hard enough for companies to tame the masses of structured data now coming their way at top speed each day, but unstructured data -- the kind that doesn't fit tidily into traditional spreadsheets or databases -- is an even bigger challenge. That's typically the domain of expert users in large enterprises equipped with high-end software, and it's also where Taste Analytics has set its sights.

Taste Analytics emerged from stealth on Thursday with the launch of Signals, a new textual analytics tool it says can help users in businesses of any size crunch a wide variety of data without having to rely on highly trained data scientists or IT experts for help.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

This startup emerged from stealth to help SMBs get a grip on unstructured data

It's hard enough for companies to tame the masses of structured data now coming their way at top speed each day, but unstructured data -- the kind that doesn't fit tidily into traditional spreadsheets or databases -- is an even bigger challenge. That's typically the domain of expert users in large enterprises equipped with high-end software, and it's also where Taste Analytics has set its sights.

Taste Analytics emerged from stealth on Thursday with the launch of Signals, a new textual analytics tool it says can help users in businesses of any size crunch a wide variety of data without having to rely on highly trained data scientists or IT experts for help.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Get ready for a customer-service overhaul in the next Dynamics CRM

Microsoft's Dynamics CRM 2016 software is just around the corner, and on Thursday the company revealed new detail about what it will include from a customer-service perspective.

Two months ago, Microsoft unveiled new aspects of the customer relationship management software relating to productivity. Now it's introducing enhancements to help agents deliver better customer service.

The updated Dynamics CRM will include new capabilities in three core areas: Agent experience, machine-learning intelligence and social engagement.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Get ready for a customer-service overhaul in the next Dynamics CRM

Microsoft's Dynamics CRM 2016 software is just around the corner, and on Thursday the company revealed new detail about what it will include from a customer-service perspective. Two months ago, Microsoft unveiled new aspects of the customer relationship management software relating to productivity. Now it's introducing enhancements to help agents deliver better customer service.

The updated Dynamics CRM will include new capabilities in three core areas: Agent experience, machine-learning intelligence and social engagement.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Microsoft finally ties the knot with Red Hat for Linux on Azure

In a move many consider long overdue, Microsoft and Red Hat on Wednesday announced a new partnership through which Microsoft will offer Red Hat Enterprise Linux as the preferred choice for enterprise Linux workloads on Azure. Azure will become a Red Hat Certified Cloud and Service Provider sometime in the next few weeks, making it possible at last for Red Hat Cloud Access subscribers to bring their own virtual machine images to run on Microsoft's cloud platform. Microsoft has long offered Azure support for other Linux distributions, but Red Hat's key enterprise offering has been conspicuously absent.

"When I first heard the news, I wanted the title of the announcement to be, 'Hell has frozen over,'" quipped Gary Chen, a research manager with IDC. "I never thought it would really happen, but it finally did."

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