Monthly Archives: August 2015

Google prépare un nouveau codec vidéo pour la 4K

Pour mieux contrer le H.265, Google prépare un nouveau codec vidéo dans ses laboratoires de recherche. Succédant au VP9 qui apportait une alternative au H.264, le VP10 entend faire mieux que son concurrent omniprésent. Il ne sera pas prêt avant plusieurs années, mais ce codec est très prometteur : la qualité de l’image devrait être meilleure, mais la compression devrait surtout être beaucoup plus importante à qualité égale. La taille des vidéos est essentielle à l’heure où le streaming devient le principal moyen d'en regarder. Comparé au H.264, le VP9 conçu par Google divisait déjà par deux la bande-passante nécessaire à qualité égale. C’est bien, mais à l’heure de la 4K, cela ne suffisait plus. Le VP10 devrait encore diviser par deux les besoins en bande-passante d’un flux vidéo à qualité égale, ou bien permettre d’améliorer la qualité du flux à taille égale. Cet objectif ambitieux est prévu pour fin 2016, ce qui laissera à Google tout le temps nécessaire pour imposer son... Lire la suite sur MacGeneration








VMware touts container management and live migration of virtual machines

VMware executives demonstrated new virtualization technologies designed to run in the data centers of the future at the company's annual VMworld conference.

VMware showed off a new capability of moving a live, running virtual machine (VM) from one data center in California to another in Virginia. Executives also demonstrated how the company is working with containers, a rapidly emerging virtualization technology popularized by Docker.

The ability to move live VMs is an advance on the company's technology, which has been available for several years. The vMotion technology offers a way to move a VM from one part of the data center to another, while keeping the application inside the VM running.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

VMware touts container management and live migration of virtual machines

VMware executives demonstrated new virtualization technologies designed to run in the data centers of the future at the company's annual VMworld conference.

VMware showed off a new capability of moving a live, running virtual machine (VM) from one data center in California to another in Virginia. Executives also demonstrated how the company is working with containers, a rapidly emerging virtualization technology popularized by Docker.

The ability to move live VMs is an advance on the company's technology, which has been available for several years. The vMotion technology offers a way to move a VM from one part of the data center to another, while keeping the application inside the VM running.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Google On companion app for OnHub router released

Trust Google to come up with products and services we sometimes don't really need or, at least, not yet. Others may not see the importance of having a smart connected home but there are those who'd like to be ahead and quickly adopt the smart home technology once readily accessible. Aside from improving Internet speed and bringing mobile connection to more people not only in the United States but also in other countries, the search giant has introduced the OnHub router less than two weeks ago. This router is a smarter and newer way to manage your Wi-Fi network and control devices at home.

The OnHub works with this companion app called Google On. Setup and control OnHub from your smartphone or table so you can start monitoring your Internet connection. Right from your mobile device, you can see how your Wi-Fi is doing and see if there's anything you should do to improve connection speed. Run a network check from your smartphone or change the settings or your network name and password.

Google seems to be very serious with organizing our digital home. The introduction of the OnHub Router and the Google On companion app is just one of the first steps to bringing the Internet of All Things concept right at home. Ready to live in a smart home? Brace yourselves because that could happen sooner than soon.

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Download Google On from the Google Play Store

[Poll] Would you buy the Samsung Gear S2 smartwatch?

If you were waiting eagerly for the official unveiling of Samsung’s next-generation smartwatch, today was an exciting day in that regard. Samsung has announced the Gear S2 smartwatch today, and it comes in three variants; the Gear S2, the Gear S2 3G, and the Gear S2 classic.

Samsung has focussed on the aesthetic appeal of its smartwatches for the first time in the past couple of years, and the final result shows. The watch comes in minimalistic as well as classic watch styles, and the company stated that it is working with third-party vendors to bring more watch bands and watch faces to its latest offerings. This means that Samsung will sooner or later offer something that suit everyone’s needs.

If you want to compare and see the differences between the Gear S2 variants, you can head over to our specifications comparison. If you have already made up your mind, we would like to know whether you are planning to buy the Gear S2. If you are, tell us which version you liked the most. If you are planning to buy a non-Samsung smartwatch, do let us know your choice as well.

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post's poll.

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Here’s the difference: Samsung Gear S2 vs. Gear S2 classic vs. Gear S2 3G

Samsung has just unveiled its next-genearation smartwatch, the Gear S2, today to compete with the likes of the Apple Watch, the LG Watch Urbane, the ASUS ZenWatch 2, the Huawei Watch, and the successor to the Motorola Moto 360.

The Gear S2 comes with high-end features such as a pixel-dense circular Super AMOLED display, a rotating bezel and two dedicated buttons for navigation within the UI, and a bevy of connectivity options as well as sensors. However, the smartwatch comes in three variants; the Gear S2, the Gear S2 classic, and the Gear S2 3G, and there are slight differences between these variants.

The Gear S2 is thinner than the Gear S2 classic, but both of them have similar connectivity options and battery capacity. Also, the Gear S2 is targeted towards those who like minimalistic design, while the Gear S2 classic is targeted towards consumers who like traditional watch-like smartwatch designs. Both of them have 250 mAh batteries than can be charged wirelessly and can last upto 2-3 days.

The Gear S2 3G is similar to the Gear S2, but comes with cellular connectivity, thanks to an e-SIM. It comes with a microphone so you can carry out voice calls and even connect to the Internet to receive notifications and all forms of updates. To support this extra form of connectivity, the Gear S2 3G has a larger 300 mAh battery, and Samsung claims that it can last upto 2 days after a single charge.

To look at the differences between these three variants closely, have a look at the comparison table on our specs comparison page below.

Click Here: Samsung Gear S2 vs. Gear S2 classic vs. Gear S2 3G

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Samsung unveils Gear S2 and Gear S2 classic smartwatches with circular Super AMOLED displays

Samsung has finally unveiled its next-generation smartwatch, the Gear S2, today after teasing it during the announcement of the Galaxy Note 5 and the Galaxy S6 edge+. The Gear S2 is the company’s first smartwatch with a completely circular display, and Samsung has focussed a lot on the appearance of the watch without letting go of hardware and software features. Unlike the past few years when Samsung was one of the few brands to experiment in the smartwatch space, the smartwatch market is quite crowded this year, thanks to the grand entry of brands like Apple and LG.

This year, the Gear S2 will be the company’s weapon to compete with the likes of the Apple Watch, the LG Watch Urbane, the ASUS ZenWatch, and the successor to Motorola’s Moto 360. Samsung’s flagship smartwatch will be offered in two variants, the Gear S2 and the Gear S2 classic, with the only changes between them being design and materials, each targeting different tastes and preferences. The 11.4 mm thin Gear S2 is targeted towards consumers who love minimal and modern design, while the 13.4 mm thin Gear S2 classic is for consumers who like a more traditional watch design approach. The Gear S2 will be offered in a dark gray case with a dark gray band and a silver case with a white band, while the Gear S2 classic will be available in an elegant black case with a matching genuine leather band.

Coming to the display, both the smartwatch variants feature 1.2-inch circular Super AMOLED displays with a resolution of 360 x 360 pixels. How is Samsung differentiating the Gear S2 from its competitors? Well, the company has invented a brand new way of interaction with the smartwatch: a rotating bezel, which we exclusively reported about earlier this year. Also, there are two additional buttons, home and back, which helps a user in accessing notifications and applications in a quicker, more accurate, and most importantly, a more comfortable manner. The watches are IP68 certified, so they are dust as well as water-resistant.

On the software side of things, these smartwatches run a Tizen-based wearable platform that is customised to be used on wearable devices with circular displays. Users can view at-a-glance notifications for calendar events, emails, messages, news, weather, and notifications from other apps with ease. They can even type or narrate custom replies using the inbuilt keyboard and the voice recognition system. The Gear S2 can receive notifications and can carry out voice calls, thanks to cellular connectivity. NFC can be used for carrying out mobile payments through Samsung Pay, and the watch can also be used as a smart car and room key or a remote control that can manage connected devices and appliances at home.

Pre-installed apps include S Health, Nike+ Running, S Voice, Weather, Calls, Contacts, Notifications, Messages, Email, Maps & Navigation, Music Player, and Gallery. There’s a Healthy Watch Face and a widget that displays your activity throughout the day. Fitness functions on the Gear S2 encourage users to stay healthy and active, and gives them a 24-hour activity log with activity progress and patters. Auto activity recognition system motivates users to be active and fit.

There are a bunch of watch faces that come pre-installed on the Gear S2 that change the information displayed on the screen depending on time, place, and occasion, and Samsung states that it is working with partners to offer a range of apps, watch faces, and bands helping the users in showcasing their style and mood. The apps will include ones for glancing news, sport scores, stocks, trending tweets, and those that show near-by places and restaurants, through a custom circular user interface.

On the inside, the Gear S2 features a “wearable-optimized” 1.0GHz dual-core processor, 512MB of RAM, and 4GB of internal storage. It is equipped with a bunch of sensors including an accelerometer, a gyroscope, a heart-rate monitor, an ambient-light sensor, a barometer, and a microphone. Connectivity is taken care of by Wi-Fi b/g/n, Bluetooth v4.1, and NFC. There’s a 250 mAh battery that can be charged wirelessly using the provided charging dock, and the company claims that the Gear S2 can last upto 2-3 days with normal usage. The Gear S2 3G, as the name suggests, also features cellular connectivity, thanks to an Embedded-SIM (e-SIM), and has a day less of battery life. The cellular variant of the smartwatch will be available through carriers in Samsung’s home market, South Korea, and in North America.

The availability or the price of the Gear S2, the Gear S2 classic, and the Gear S2 3G hasn’t been announced yet, but the watches will be displayed on September 3 during IFA 2015 at Berlin. What do you think about the Gear S2? Do you think that it is equipped enough to defeat the Apple Watch and other Android Wear-based smartwatches from other brands? Tell us what you think in the comments section below.

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Sony Japan crowdfunds Wena smartwatch

Sony Wena_1Sony Japan has developed a new product in its “First Flight” crowdfunding platform in the form of the Wena Wrist smartwatch. The Wena watch takes a different approach versus other smartwatches, fusing all of the main technology into its wrist band with an analogue watch face.

The Wena wrist includes NFC, as well as other features expected of a smartwatch, including notifications of incoming emails, SMS and fitness logging (steps and calories burned). Notifications are received through LED indicator lights on the band or vibrations. Interestingly, Sony has also made sure the phone is waterproof too. Several versions of the watch are available with prices starting from 34,800 yen going up to 69,800 yen.

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Via Sony Japan and First-Flight.

Thanks Diogo and Srijan!

ITC reverses course, rules Microsoft’s phones don’t infringe on patents

Microsoft has prevailed over InterDigital in a years-old patent infringement action that was originally brought against Nokia in front of the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC). 

On Friday, the commission ruled that Nokia phones don't infringe on patents held by InterDigital relating to 3G cellular data standards, overturning a previous decision from earlier this year. It's good news for Microsoft, since the ITC has the power to block imports of products that it determines are infringing patents. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

ITC reverses course, rules Microsoft’s phones don’t infringe on patents

Microsoft has prevailed over InterDigital in a years-old patent infringement action that was originally brought against Nokia in front of the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC). 

On Friday, the commission ruled that Nokia phones don't infringe on patents held by InterDigital relating to 3G cellular data standards, overturning a previous decision from earlier this year. It's good news for Microsoft, since the ITC has the power to block imports of products that it determines are infringing patents. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

How to hide purchased books from iBooks

Tony Leneis would like to keep some of the books he’s purchased from Apple from appearing in iBooks.

I have Apple’s manuals for iPhones, iPads, and iPods for iOS 6, 7, and 8. At this point I only want the iOS 8 manuals, but while I can delete the book files from my devices, they still are listed on my bookshelf as downloadable from the cloud. What makes this particular maddening is the titles for many of the aforementioned books are too long to view in iBooks, so the only way to find the iOS 8 version for iPhone is to download and open each iPhone manual until I find the right one.

The bad news: Once you obtain a book from Apple, it’s forever in your iCloud account. It will follow you to the end of time, like a cloudy spectre of words.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

How to hide purchased books from iBooks

Tony Leneis would like to keep some of the books he’s purchased from Apple from appearing in iBooks.

I have Apple’s manuals for iPhones, iPads, and iPods for iOS 6, 7, and 8. At this point I only want the iOS 8 manuals, but while I can delete the book files from my devices, they still are listed on my bookshelf as downloadable from the cloud. What makes this particular maddening is the titles for many of the aforementioned books are too long to view in iBooks, so the only way to find the iOS 8 version for iPhone is to download and open each iPhone manual until I find the right one.

The bad news: Once you obtain a book from Apple, it’s forever in your iCloud account. It will follow you to the end of time, like a cloudy spectre of words.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

How to hide purchased books from iBooks

Tony Leneis would like to keep some of the books he’s purchased from Apple from appearing in iBooks.

I have Apple’s manuals for iPhones, iPads, and iPods for iOS 6, 7, and 8. At this point I only want the iOS 8 manuals, but while I can delete the book files from my devices, they still are listed on my bookshelf as downloadable from the cloud. What makes this particular maddening is the titles for many of the aforementioned books are too long to view in iBooks, so the only way to find the iOS 8 version for iPhone is to download and open each iPhone manual until I find the right one.

The bad news: Once you obtain a book from Apple, it’s forever in your iCloud account. It will follow you to the end of time, like a cloudy spectre of words.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Video shows how to get your S-Pen unstuck in Galaxy Note 5

We’ve heard the arguments pro and against Samsung regarding this whole "S-Pen gets stuck if you put it in backwards in the Galaxy Note 5, from the humorous to the ridiculous to the rational. But the more important thing now, moving forward, particularly for the owners of the newest phablet from the Korean OEM is: “what do you do when your S-Pen actually gets stuck there???” Fortunately, a YouTube tech channel has found a simple and truly inexpensive way to set it free.

And when we mean set it free, it doesn’t just mean you get to remove your S-Pen, but it also means you actually don’t damage the detection sensor and the S-Pen itself. Damaging that sensor will actually render your phablet useless, that is why Galaxy Note 5 owners who for some reason or another put their S-Pen backwards are howling to the moon. The good news is that How2Tech posted a video on their channel showing that with just a piece of paper, you can get it unstuck without causing damage to the other parts.

According to the video, which of course demo-ed the actual Note 5 and S-Pen, you just cut a strip of paper around 6 inches long, with the width just enough to go around the curve of the S-Pen. Then curl the paper around a pen so that it will be able to wrap itself around the protruding part of the S-Pen. Slide the paper onto the holding bay along the side of the pen. When it reaches the sensor near the end of the holding bay, then you’ll be able to slide the S-Pen since the detector sensor is out of the way (of sorts).

Of course sliding in the piece of paper isn’t as easy or as simple as it sounds like, and you’ll see in the video that it takes some time to be able to do so. But hey, you would endure that rather than seeing your $800 Galaxy Note 5 down the drain, wouldn’t you?

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